Taura "Aura" Jackson talks about "Crazy" and Static Major


I've posted some information on the blog exclusive joint "Crazy" by Aura already, but I figured it would make more sense if we heard it straight from her, because she was actually there. So here is the very talented Aura talking about the history of the track:

I was signed to Atlantic at the time. Gee Roberson was my A&R and he manages Kanye. Kanye came to the studio and had forgotten his records, but I'm an avid Joni Mitchell fan and had some of her records there. It was like magic watching Kanye work. He crafted that beat like it was a priceless sculpture. When it started to come together Gee, who managed Static at that time too said "What do you think about Static co-writing with you?" Well, I was ecstatic, pun fully intended. Within an hour or so, Static came over. I was fully aware and familiar with his work with Playa, Aaliyah, Genuine and he had also written my girl Truth Hurts super sick single "Addicted", so I was excited. He came in; Kanye had a long flight and fell asleep on the sofa. I sat in the control room with Static and watched the pure unadulterated creativity that exuded from this genius called Static Major. He didn't write anything down, like Jay-Z. He would bring a pretty lady to remember for him, and she'd write it down. I chimed in added my truth to his perception of me and it was magical. Anyway, he went into the booth and laid the song in like one take, maybe two. My husband Alonzo Jackson was there the whole time, as impressed and floored as I was. When Static was getting ready to leave, Kanye woke up and couldn't believe that he was done so fast and he was highly impressed with this writer extraordinaire that never disappointed him. They both left within ten minutes and left me there to record it by myself. A couple hours later they came back and LOVED how it came out. They both talked about how they thought that it would be a huge record for all of us, but honestly it was already huge for me. I was an instant fan of Kanye and the vision that he had for his future, that played out exactly as he hoped and prayed and I had been a fan of Static's for a while, so I was basking in the moment. It took Clipse a good while to lay their part but it was finally done, Gee called me and said "You've got to hear this". Then Kanye called and said "They laced you" and it was actually "Crazy" to me because I really felt like the perfect balance had been calibrated. At the initial session, Kanye said on the intro "...I know that Joni Mitchell never lied". But at the mix session he changed it to "...I know my homie Aura never lied". I cried, yo. It was coming together. He wrote the script for the little intro about not going work to work tomorrow and all was beautiful, or so I thought.
After months and months of going back and forth Joni Mitchell finally decided that she was not going to clear the sample. I prayed so hard, like PLEASE, but her mind was made up, and honestly I respect her reason not to clear the sample, which was not to support the economy at the time of war which she and I are both opposed to. But it was my first single, a single that only a select few had a chance to hear, love and appreciate, hate or whateva', as long as you heard it. I was dropped Atlantic, but I would not trade that experience for the world. I worked with Kanye several more times and hadn't heard from Static until my husband starting working for Aftermath. He was and A&R for an extraordinary artist named Tiffany Villarreal and when they started looking for writers for her project I of course went right to Myspace and sent Static a message. I said something like, "I'm not sure if you remember me, but yadi-yah" and he responded with "What? Of course I remember you; I still think that your song would have been my biggest". At around the same time a girl that I knew had given me his number so I just called him. He was actually in Miami working with Little Wayne and he was so happy to hear from me. We talked for a good minute, gloating on Kanye's success and how proud we both were of him. He encouraged me not to give up and told me that I should still leak the song, but I never did. So Dre ended up flying him to California and he wrote songs for Tiffany in the same fashion, him like a soul crooning Jay-Z with a little chic by his side, penning his every thought. That was the last time that I saw him..I think that was 2006.
Static was a force, a lyrical genius and as he always said "Can't nobody eff with me and these harmonies".
I know that he's now in peace....probably still writing for Aaliyah and I know it's angelic and beautiful.
Rest in peace, good brotha'.

Love always,
Taura "Aura" Jackson

It's an amazing read, especially to those who admired Static's amazing talent. I would definitely have to agree with Static when he said "Crazy" would have potentially been a huge hit, because the song is timeless. It's still as hot as when I first heard it a couple of years ago.

I'd also like to thank Taura for sharing this information with us at the blog. I contacted her on Facebook a while ago and didn't really expect a reply, but she was cool all the way through.

Check out her myspace page because she definitely has some heat on there.
http://www.myspace.com/aurajackson

4 comments:

producer James Moore said...

not sure if Tiffany is still on Aftermath, I definitely hope those songs get released ... I remember her from Raekwon's video, and then she was supposed to be in a girl group on Star Trak ... and I never knew Gee Roberson managed Static

Anonymous said...

great read, t4p!

LCSS said...

Of course the "Crazy" joint is hot...Clipse on the flow, Kanye on the track...Aura has a great voice. Nice post, insightful read

Neeze said...

Gee never managed Static. He was a good friend of ours and Static had a song deal with Atlantic so when ever thier was some R and B to do, they always called him.

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